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Copyright

An Introduction to Copyright in An Educational Situation

Adaptations

What Constitutes an Adaptation?

The answer to this can be tricky based on jurisdiction and "judge roulette." 

In general, an adaptation is a work wherein you, as a creator, have made a change in some significant way, to an original creation. 

 

What Doesn't Count Under Basic US Copyright Law?

Spelling changes

Just quoting from someone else's work in yours

 

What Doesn't Count Under Creative Commons Licensing?

Because CC licensing follows any format a creation may take, an openly licensed digital book can be printed without violating CC licensing of NoDerivative. Note that under US Law, printing of an eBook may constitute a violation--always check licensing!

 

What Counts Under Creative Common Licensing Even If It Doesn't Count Under US Copyright Law?

Music synced with a moving image

Some uses of databases

("FAQ.")

Licensing

When you have created a new work derived from the works of others, licensing can get more complicated.  Some hard and fast rules to consider:

  • If you created a new work that was licensed ND, you cannot share your work, therefore you need no CC licensing
  • Similarly, other types of licensing may prohibit you from licensing without consideration. In order to be in compatible compliance, refer to the chart below.
  • If some component of the original work or works had a SA license, you are obligated to share your new creation with the same license.

Attribution

All good attributions include the basic information of TASL.  TASL is an easy way to cover all your bases.

T-Title of the work

A-Author of the work

S-Source of the work (include URL if available)

L-License of the original work (if possible, hyperlink to deed.  If not possible, spell out the URL).

("4.4")

When creating your license, consider the following chart.

CC Adapters License Chart / CC BY 4.0

If you are working with more than one previously created item and remixing it, then consider the following chart.  Look for the license of the first item on the y axis, then the license of the second item on the x axis.  Do they have a check mark where they meet?  If so, you can remix those items into one new whole that may be shared.

CC License Compatibility Chart.  Grid of checkmarks and Xs based on compatibility of various licenses.

CC License Compatibility Chart / CC BY 4.0

Collections

What Constitutes a Collection?

A collection, by Creative Commons and Copyright licensing terms, is a group of disparate, discrete items brought together.  Each item retains has their own copyright and/or CC licensing.  When brought together, they do not constitute an adaptation or a remix.  They are simply held in a collection.

Attribution

Just because you are not "adapting" a work, however, you still need to pay attention to licensing (unless it falls under Fair Use, of course, although proper attribution is always the best practice).  Each item in your collection should be properly attributed and licensing permissions should be provided and adhered to ("4.4").

All good attributions include the basic information of TASL.  TASL is an easy way to cover all your bases.

T-Title of the work

A-Author of the work

S-Source of the work (include URL if available)

L-License of the original work (if possible, hyperlink to deed.  If not possible, spell out the URL).

Licensing

Which license should you apply to your new collection?  First, it's very important to understand that any license you choose applies solely to anything "new" you have added or your arrangement of the items in your collection.  For instance, if you place several existing pictures of fruit in a bowl image of your own design, you only have copyright protections over the bowl and your particular order and placement of the fruit (this could also apply to any background you may create). Your license has no bearing on the licensing of the fruit images you brought together.  The extant licenses of those individual items remain in place.

("4.3")

OER Books Used at RCC

SAO Survey